January 27, 2012

iPod line experiences major decline year-over-year

Apple has just posted its first quarter fiscal 2012 results. (There is a live conference call to follow). One of the biggest items to pop from the press release is the status of the iPod.

Unlike iPhones, iPads, and Macs, all of which experienced terrific gains, the 11-year-old iPod line experienced a 21% unit decline year-over-year, from last winter’s quarter.

Apple did not introduce a new iPod touch this Autumn, breaking a tradition of Fall iPod launches and refreshes.

Of course, the function of an iPod or iPod touch has been filled for many customers by the iPhone, which sold like gangbusters this quarter.



TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog

Install iOS 5 On Your iPhone 2G/3G Or Old iPod Touch Using WhiteD00r, No Jailbreak Required

Install iOS 5 On Your iPhone 2G/3G Or Old iPod Touch Using WhiteD00r, No Jailbreak Required

Do you have an old first or second gen iPod touch or iPhone? If so, you’re probably pretty red-faced with jealousy about all of those cool new iOS 5 features you’re missing out on: multi-tasking, reminders, iCloud, homescreen folders and so on.

There’s no reason your face has to be so flushed, though. Thanks to Whited00r, you can get iOS 5”s best features on your old iPod touch or iPhone 3G, no jailbreak required.

How does it work? The Whited00r dev team has basically built a custom version of Apple’s official iOS 5, specially catered towards the ARM6 family of Apple devices: the iPhone 2G & 3G, and the iPod Touch 1G and 2G. You just download the IPSW firmware and install it through iTunes, just like a regular software update. Here’s the installation guide: it’s dead simple.

Once your device has been restored using WhiteD00r 5.1, you’ll have most of iOS 5”s best features, including multitasking, reminders, a rough approximation of iCloud that uses Dropbox as a core, folders, Newsstand, and even custom wallpapers.

Sadly, there is a caveat, though. Notification Center doesn’t come along with the package, and you also lose out on the App Store (although you can still buy, download and install apps through iTunes).

We haven’t tried Whited00r personally — I simply don’t have any iOS devices lying around that are that old — but this looks legit, and the forums are filled with happy users. If you’ve got an ancient iPod touch or iPhone and want to extend its life just a little bit longer, give Whited00r a try.

You can download Whited00r here.

John BrownleeJohn Brownlee is news editor here at Cult of Mac, and has also written about a lot of things for a lot of different places, including Wired, Playboy, Boing Boing, Popular Mechanics, Gizmodo, Kotaku, Lifehacker, AMC, Geek and the Consumerist. He lives in Cambridge with his charming inamorata and a tiny budgerigar punningly christened after Nabokov’s most famous pervert. You can follow him here on Twitter.

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iPod Nano Watch? Forget That. Try An iPod Nano Bracelet Instead

iPod Nano Watch? Forget That. Try An iPod Nano Bracelet Instead

For a pretty big chunk of users, the iPod nano isn’t just an MP3 player, it’s also their watch. But what if you want something a little less watch-like from your nano? Maybe it’s time for a Nanolet — an iPod nano watchband that looks and acts a bit more like a bracelet, letting a tiny sliver of your wrist peek through.

You can grab one right now from Curecreative in a variety of colors including black, white, red, indigo and grey for just $ 21.52.

(Can’t find Similar Posts)

John BrownleeJohn Brownlee is news editor here at Cult of Mac, and has also written about a lot of things for a lot of different places, including Wired, Playboy, Boing Boing, Popular Mechanics, Gizmodo, Kotaku, Lifehacker, AMC, Geek and the Consumerist. He lives in Cambridge with his charming inamorata and a tiny budgerigar punningly christened after Nabokov’s most famous pervert. You can follow him here on Twitter.

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Cult of Mac

A giant pulsing blacklight for your iPhone or iPod

This has been out for a while, but in the same booth where Engadget found the Watch Your Bag crapgadget there’s a giant blacklight dock that will pulse to the beat. Oh, and it has speakers. You can opt to leave the black light on if you want (no sync to music), or have it strobe. Naturally it’ll work with iPods as well, so you can practically set up a nightclub in an instant. Provided you don’t mind toting a 4-foot iPod dock around. At $ 149.99 from Sharper Image, I doubt these are flying off the shelves.



TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog

iPod shuffle debuted on this day in 2005

On January 11, 2005, Apple introduced the iPod shuffle to the world.

Designed as a way to enjoy music while exercising, the shuffle brought random play of music to the iPod. The first edition of this device looked remarkably like a white stick of gum, featuring no display or scroll wheel, and plugging right into a USB port for syncing. It was also the first Apple iPod to do away with an internal hard drive, using only flash memory to store music.

Since that time, the iPod shuffle has been transformed several times. The first change in September, 2006 turned the device into a small clip-like device similar to the iPod shuffle we know and love today. The third-generation shuffle, which was introduced in March of 2009, took small size to a ridiculous extreme. This model did away with on-device controls, using volume and track buttons on the white earbuds instead. It was also the first iPod to provide VoiceOver to announce track names and other information to listeners.

The latest incarnation of the iPod shuffle returned to the larger size of the second generation device, bringing back the buttons and retaining VoiceOver. Announced on September 1, 2010, the current iPod shuffle costs only US$ 49 for 2 GB of storage and comes in five colors.

Happy anniversary to the popular and low-priced iPod shuffle!



TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog

The iNuke Boom iPod Dock Is So Big You’ll Need A Forklift To Move It [CES 2012]

The iNuke Boom iPod Dock Is So Big You’ll Need A Forklift To Move It [CES 2012]

The iNuke Boom iPod Dock Is So Big You’ll Need A Forklift To Move It [CES 2012]Las Vegas, CES 2012 — One trend we weren’t expecting to see at CES was the enormous amount of ultra-portable speakers every company is trying to sell. The type that look like a soda can cut in half that pops up to reveal a speaker that has the magical “unparalleled sound quality” all their makers brag about. For over twenty years Behringerhas produced professional audio products, but have only recently decided to enter the consumer space. So what does a high-quality audio company do to make themselves standout in a market saturated with mediocre speaker products? Make a really really nice ultra-portable speaker? WRONG! They go and create the biggest iPod Dock ever that makes those minature docks look miserably insignificant.

The iNuke Boom is one of 50 Behringer audio products made for consumers that are hitting the market this year. We had seen pictures of the iNuke before, but we were left speechless as the sweet bassy tones washed over our faces when we approached the iPod Station in real-life. It’s like seeing the Keebler elves in real life – you can’t believe they exsist. The iNuke Boom is a mythological audio device that isn’t  just big, it’s freaking massive. You could have a dance party on top of this thing.

It’s fitting that the we were introduced to the iNuke Boom in Las Vegas – a post-modernist city of fractured dreamscapes where life is all about playing rather than the search for meaning. The iNuke Boom is what Vegas is all about. It’s a tongue in-cheek joke poking fun at a tech industry that is obsessed with one-uping each other by making their next products bigger and louder. It’s like Beringer is saying, “Ok, you want to talk about how big your sound is, well we’re going to cause a supernova with our audio-station just to show how ridiculous everyone is.” The point comes across savagely loud and creates room for the company’s 49 other consumer audio products to be noticed.

Berhinger insists that the iNuke Boom is a real product that they are actually selling. For $ 29,999 a Berhinger rep will come to your house, help you decide the best place to display your iPod dock, then deliver the 700lbs behemoth to your front door and get everything setup. The only input port for the iNuke Boom is a 30-pin iPod connector on the top of the device (and no, a free iPod is not included in your $ 30k purchase). The front of the dock emits over 10,000 watts of sound, while the back is nothing more than a flat black backing plate that contains a simple volume control knob, power button, and an “iNuke Mode” switch.

We asked Berhinger how many speakers they have under the hood but they were wont to tell us other than saying they’re using “at least 2 18inch subwoofers” and a nuclear ton of speakers. Production starts soon and units should be shipped out in Q2 of 2012. The company claims they’ve actually received a lot of interest from home owners as well as restraunt and club owners.

Is the iNuke Boom ridiculous? Absolutely. But it’s also fun and completely cognizant of it’s audacity, which is something we commend even if we don’t feel comfortable dropping fat stacks of cash on a monstrous beast.

The iNuke Boom iPod Dock Is So Big You’ll Need A Forklift To Move It [CES 2012]

A simple iPod Dock is the only feature on the top of the iNuke Boom.

The iNuke Boom iPod Dock Is So Big You’ll Need A Forklift To Move It [CES 2012]

The back of the iNuke Boom

Cult of Mac

Apple References Siri Dictation On iPod touch And iPad In Latest iOS 5.1 Beta

Apple References Siri Dictation On iPod touch And iPad In Latest iOS 5.1 Beta

Today’s iOS 5.1 beta 3 makes some interesting references to Siri’s Dictation feature. On both the iPod touch and iPad, a new Dictation text file has appeared under the keyboard settings window. This new document is not present in the same place on the iPhone 4S, suggesting that this reference does indeed foreshadow what’s to come.

The text file outlines iOS Dictation’s privacy details. While Siri Dictation is currently an iPhone 4S-only feature, it’s plausible to assume that Apple is working to bring the feature to other iOS devices.

Apple References Siri Dictation On iPod touch And iPad In Latest iOS 5.1 Beta

9to5Mac also found this reference on the iPad, but it’s interesting to see that it is also present on the iPod touch. While some have speculated that Apple would make Siri Dictation a staple feature of the next-generation iPad, it seems that the company’s plans for Siri may be more far-reaching than we all expected.

Apple References Siri Dictation On iPod touch And iPad In Latest iOS 5.1 Beta

(Thanks, Michael!)

Alex HeathAlex Heath is an afternoon news contributor at Cult of Mac. He also serves as an editor and contributor for the iDownloadBlog. You can find out more about him on his personal site and also follow him on Twitter.

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Cult of Mac

Deckster Re:Class iPod nano watchband is really nice, really expensive

The sixth-generation iPod nano has spawned a host of watchbands, all designed to turn the diminutive music player into a cool watch. Up until now, though, I haven’t seen one that would make me shell out $ 129 to $ 149 for a nano just to have a watch. The Deckster Re:Class watchband from N-Product (CAD$ 165) would have changed all of that, but that price tag is the downfall of this otherwise very nice band.

N-Product makes all of the Re:Class bands from recycled materials. The review watchband, for example, uses bicycle tire inner tubes and treads to make a comfortable, stylish, and tough band. The company partnered with Mountain Equipment Co-op to take leftover materials from backpacks for some of the other bands, and uses 99.9% recycled aluminum for the unique casing that holds the iPod nano in place.

The name Deckster comes from that casing. When the entrepreneurs at N-Product were thinking about a way to hold an iPod nano in place but make it easy to insert and remove, they thought about old cassette tape decks. Many cassette tape decks had a “door” that folded out; you open the door, placed the cassette into the door, then closed it. The Deckster design works the same way. There’s a button that releases a latch when pressed, and the top of the casing opens up. A nano slides into the casing easily, at which point you close the door until it clicks securely into place. N-Product emblazons the inside of the case with a painting of a cassette to honor the memory of that ancient media format.

I personally don’t own an iPod nano, so I lent the review unit to a friend who has one. He commented that the Deckster did a much better job of holding the iPod nano in place than most of the other wristbands. Several of those (the iWatchz Q, for example) use the clip on the back of the nano to hold it in place. The Hex Icon uses a bulky box-like structure to hold the nano, while the LunaTik is designed for permanently encasing your nano. My friend liked the way the Deckster case worked to make inserting and removing the nano a snap.

So, my buddy was impressed with the Deckster, until I told him the price. Yes, it’s in Canadian dollars, but the website’s conversion tools shows that still makes the Re:Class band US$ 160.58. Considering that’s over twice the price of the HEX Vision stainless steel band (US$ 69.95) and double what many of the LunaTik cases run (US$ 79.95), the pricing is completely out of line. Sure, the convenience of being able to pop your 6G nano in and out of the Deckster is nice, but is paying more than the cost of the nano itself for a watchband a really smart idea? You decide.



TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog

Inside Apple’s 2011: iPod, iPhone & iPad

By Daniel Eran Dilger

Published: 04:04 PM EST (01:04 PM PST)
This year, Apple’s mobile iOS platform reached its fifth annual release, adding new support for subscription content, iCloud, and new devices including the iPad 2, a CDMA iPhone 4 and the global iPhone 4S with Siri voice assistance. Meanwhile, the iPod line got no major updates for the first time in its history, as Apple continues to convert its iPod business into iOS device sales.

Record sales of iOS devices

In 2011, Apple’s sales of iOS devices surged so dramatically during the launch cycles of new iPad 2 and iPhone 4S models that the company’s demolishing of its previous year’s quarterly records–and its annihilation of all competitors’ sales–in prelaunch quarters wasn’t enough to prevent critics from voicing their disappointment.

During the company’s fiscal Q2 launch of iPad 2, Apple sold “only” 4.69 million tablets as it scrambled to build enough devices to meet demand for the new model. In the year ago quarter of 2010, Apple wasn’t selling any iPads because it hadn’t even introduced the product yet.

In contrast, Microsoft’s decade old Tablet PC business, recycled last year under “Slate PC” branding with partner HP, completely collapsed, sending the company back to the drawing board to revamp its Windows 7 tablet platform for a second try expected to appear possibly as soon as the end of 2012, leaving it missing in action throughout the entire launch year of iPad 2 (and its next successor).

Despite desperate efforts by Samsung to portray its 2010 winter Galaxy Tab sales as “quite smooth,” and Motorola’s Xoom ads portraying Apple’s iPad first as a museum relic and then as a tool for propagating a dreary dystopian world, neither companys’ tablet products had any impact on Apple’s sales in 2011, failing completely on their own with dismal sales.

Google’s rushed release of Android 3.0 Honeycomb, focused exclusively on producing tablets that could challenge the iPad this year, itself collapsed alongside Slate PC after waves of failed attempts by its licensees to deliver tablet devices capable of gaining a healthy fraction of Apple’s “disappointing” Q2 iPad sales.

RIM and HP similarly attempted to jump on the tablet bandwagon driven by Apple’s iPad, but even after ditching Microsoft’s Windows 7 for Palm’s webOS, HP couldn’t manage to effectively launch even an initial foundation for its own tablet platform. After may delays, RIM finally launched an actual product in 2011, but its PlayBook failed miserably as well. The design ended up being resold by Amazon in a scaled down version with a year old, customized version of Android 2.x tied to Amazon’s store and sold as a loss leader under the Kindle Fire brand.

Similarly, in its fall fiscal Q4, Apple “only” sold 17.07 million iPhones, sending analysts into confused disappointment for not reaching their forecasts of 20 million smartphones in a quarter where the company had delayed the launch of its new iPhone 4S while it continued outselling every other smartphone on the US market with its year old iPhone 4 and the second place, two year old iPhone 3GS.

Apple’s iOS sales grew tremendously in 2011 even as the sales of leading smartphone makers Nokia and RIM collapsed. Efforts by Microsoft to sell Windows Phone 7 and by HP to ship webOS smartphones both failed to gain any traction this year, leaving Apple’s mobile platform to be compared solely against the communal efforts of the rest of the entire industry working with an open source project.

Even so, all the efforts of every vendor globally using some aspect of Google’s Android software still couldn’t match the unit sales of Apple’s iOS platform, and were not even remotely comparable to the revenues and profits Apple’s iOS generated in 2011. Conversely, however, Apple was not regularly lavished with praise for having collected overwhelming “market share” among web browsers just for being the central repository for the maintenance of its WebKit open source project used within the majority of mobile browsers and, in 2011, the majority of desktop browsers as well.

iPod iced, reanimated as an iOS app

Apple’s iPod dynasty, which ruled over the past decade in the field of portable media players, contracted significantly in fiscal 2011, dropping from last year’s sales plateau of 50.3 million down to 42.6 million units this year. That didn’t offer any hope for competitors however, because Apple essentially had just converted many of its iPod sales to even higher margin iOS devices running the iPod app.

Over half of the iPods Apple now sells are the iOS-based iPod touch, and Apple now sells far more iPhones and iPads per quarter than all iPods combined. Had Apple simply branded its other iOS devices as “iPod phone” and “iPod tablet,” it could have reported sales of 34.8 million “iPod” devices in its most recent “disappointing” quarter, a unit increase of more than 27 percent over its previous quarterly record sales of 27.34 million devices in the year ago quarter, rather than the 27 percent decline in in the sales of “iPod branded devices” when excluding the iPhone and iPad.

This year, Microsoft finally threw in the towel on its Zune brand of media players. But Apple itself also ended the reign of its “iPod classic” using a conventional hard drive and click wheel navigation, the original design that had propelled Apple Computer into consumer devices and ultimately erased the “computer” designation from its corporate name. While not officially discontinued and still on sale though out the 2011 holiday season, the iPod classic wasn’t even mentioned during Apple’s October iPod event.

Even more tellingly, in 2011 Apple for the first time failed to significantly overhaul any its iPod-branded lineup, leaving in place its 2010, sixth generation iPod nano with only minor software adjustments, giving its fourth generation iPod touch just a new white option and leaving its iPod shuffle completely unchanged, apart from lower prices.

Apple also noted that it has now sold over 300 million iPods worldwide over the past decade, but it has also revealed in the same month that 250 million iOS devices have been sold since the iPhone first appeared in 2007, highlighting the remarkable sales growth Apple has experienced, and the tremendous shift it has made from selling simple hard drive music players to building advanced mobile computers capable of powering a ecosystem of apps.

On page 2 of 2: A new generation of iOS devices

AppleInsider

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

The Redsn0w software by DevTeam has always allowed you to jailbreak your iOS device, giving you complete control over your iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch (see why you should jailbreak here). This morning, though, redsn0w version 0.9.1ob1 was released with iOS 5 support, meaning you can now jailbreak devices and run Cydia apps on devices with iOS 5 installed. Here’s how to jailbreak iOS 5!

Ingredients:

  • A compatible iOS device
  • That same device updated to firmware iOS 5.0.1
  • iTunes 10.5.2
  • redsn0w 0.9.10b1 for Mac.

Please backup all your information using iTunes before following this tutorial.

1. Download redsn0w and extract the ZIP. Double-click to open redsn0w application.

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

2. Click the ‘Jaibreak’ button below the text. Now it will ask you to connect the device to your Mac/PC and then turn it off, do so and click ‘Next’. Now follow the on-screen instructions to proceed.

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

3.  The device will reboot while redns0w prepares the jailbreak data.

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

4. Then choose if you want to install Cydia and click the ‘Next’ button.

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

5. The device will reboot showing ‘Downloading Jailbreak Data’ logo and then some code on the device’s screen, while redsn0w sends modified files to the device. You will be notified once redsn0w is done. Let the rest of process continue on the device, please be patient.

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

How To Jailbreak iOS 5.0.1 On Your iPad, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS or iPod Touch [Jailbreak Superguide]

6. After it reboots, your device should now be jailbroken with Cydia on the homescreen.

That’s it! You’re done! Let us know how you got along in the comments.

All credit for the great tool goes to the DevTeam.

Cult of Mac